Welcome to North American Technician Excellence, Inc. The leading non-profit certification program for technicians in the heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC/R) industry and the only test supported by the entire industry.

NORTH AMERICAN TECHNICIAN EXCELLENCE

2111 Wilson Blvd. Suite 510Arlington, VA 22201Phone: 703-276-7247Toll Free Phone: 877-420-6283 (NATE)
Posted by
09 May 2012
The NATE Advantage
Jackson Systems  

Yellow Jacket

2012 NEWS Directory

 

 

 

 

This message is brought to you on behalf of the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration News.

We hope you’re enjoying your subscription to The NEWS. Visit us online at www.achrnews.com for daily news updates and the latest product information.

NATE News: ANSI Accreditation Achieved

ANSI AccrediationARLINGTON, Va. — American National Standards Institute (ANSI) officially recognized North American Technician Excellence (NATE) as an ANSI-accredited certification body. ANSI has served as the coordinator of the U.S. private sector, voluntary standardization system for more than 90 years.

In early 2011, NATE formally applied for ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024 accreditation, which involved a review of all practices and processes in place. Based on the 17024 requirements, NATE implemented a wide range of updates and enhancements to strengthen its processes and ensure that the integrity of NATE certification is upheld at all levels.

On December 13, 2011, the ANSI Personnel Certification Accreditation Committee (PCAC) met to review NATE’s assessment report. Upon their review, PCAC granted NATE ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024 accreditation as a qualified Certification Body.

“The entire NATE family has spent countless hours working towards this accomplishment, and we could not be more proud that NATE has achieved ANSI accreditation,” stated Peter Schwartz, NATE president and CEO. “ANSI accreditation validates NATE’s ongoing commitment to meeting the highest professional standards of examination development, further establishing NATE as an unrivaled certification body in the HVACR certification arena.”

Don Frendberg, chairman of the NATE Board of Trustees, said, “NATE is the only certification organization developed and supported by the entire HVACR industry, and this impressive achievement exemplifies why NATE is the true leader in certifying technician excellence.”

ANSI provides a neutral forum for the development of policies on standards issues and serves as a watchdog for standards development and conformity assessment. The ANSI Federation also accredits qualified organizations, whose standards development process meets all of ANSI’s requirements, to develop American National Standards. Through these efforts, ANSI aims to enhance the competitiveness of U.S. businesses, while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

For more information visit www.natex.org or www.ansi.org.


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NATE Test Question
A technician measures the return air temperature of a 100,000 Btuh output furnace to be 65°F and the supply air temperature to be 135°. What is the cfm?

A. 690
B. 1,211
C. 1,323
D. 1,428

Read the explanation to find out the answer below or

scroll to the bottom of this e-newsletter to see the answer.

Don’t Underestimate Airflow Calculations

The importance of airflow cannot be overstated. When selecting equipment based on the OEM specification guide, none of the values listed mean a thing unless the airflow matches what’s listed in the guide. By the same token, troubleshooting a system by measuring actual operating values such as superheat and subcooling cannot be counted on to provide an accurate diagnostic snapshot for the unit unless the airflow in cfm (cubic feet per minute) is known. For all these reasons the sensible heat formula must be known, used and understood by every service technician in the HVAC industry. As shown below the formula can be stated in a variety of ways.

Btuh = 1.08 x CFM x TD

TD = Btuh x (1.08 x CFM)

CFM = Btuh/ (1.08 x TD)

The most common question about this formula is: Where did the constant 1.08 come from? It’s a property of air at sea level based on .076 pounds of air in a cubic foot multiplied by .24 which is the specific heat of standard air at sea level multiplied by 60 which is the number of minutes in an hour.
To use the formula we need to know two of the values to calculate the third. In our question above, we know the TD is 70º (135º – 65º = 70º) and the Btuh (100,000). So we apply the formula to get the following:

CFM = 100,000 / (1.08 x 70)

CFM = 100,000 / 75.6

CFM = 1,322.7 (rounded up to 1,323)

 

That makes the correct answer to our question above “c”. Keep in mind that any calculation made in the field is only as accurate as the values taken. As an example, if there are two supply ducts coming off the plenum, take a temperature reading in both, add them together and divide that number by two to obtain better “averaged” temperature rise. Also, allow the system to run in heat at least 15 minutes before taking the temperatures to allow the system to equalize. Check the temperature sensors you’re using and if they are not displaying the same temperature when placed in the same place, use only one of them to measure both the supply and return. And when using this formula on a natural gas furnace, remember the value to use is “output”, not “input” and of course the furnace should be fired properly so verify the firing rate by checking manifold pressure and clocking the meter.

Another way to utilize this valuable formula is with electric heaters. To calculate Btuh on single phase electric heaters, measure the voltage at the heater and the amperage of only the heater, so don’t include motor amps. Volts x amps x 3.415 will provide Btuh, you then calculate temperature rise (TD) which gives you the two values needed to apply the formula above to obtain cfm.

Remember, system capacity, performance, life expectancy of the components and occupant comfort are directly tied to proper airflow. Always verify airflow prior to adjusting refrigerant charge.

For additional application and troubleshooting help or to find a wide range of instructional PDFs you can download at no cost, visit http://www.virginiaair.com/technicalservicesupport.php?section=forms.

NATE Tip: Website Navigation

Here’s a hot tip to help you find exactly what you are looking for on www.natex.org. Check out the search box in the upper right hand corner. Type in the topic you want to know more about and click “Submit.”

You will be directly linked to a page of information on the topic of your choice. If you don’t find it the first time, try using a broader search term.

NATE Home Page

Update Your NATE

How important is it to keep up to date with NATE? Very! It is important to keep all of your personal information current with NATE including your email, home address, and employer information. This is how we stay in contact, and inform you of new information pertaining to NATE such as test results, renewal notifications, and e-newsletters like the NATE Advantage. If your email isn’t up to date, how will you receive this information?

And, if you don’t update your employer information when you switch jobs, we can’t approve you for the consumer contractor technician listing. The NATE certification belongs to you, so make sure you update your information to take full advantage of it.

To update your information, log on to www.natetesting.com, click “Candidates” and use your NATE ID and PIN or log in with your MyNATE username and password.

Managing Airflow with Zoning

Many homes around the United States have only one centrally located thermostat, and unless it’s a very small home, that single thermostat almost guarantees that the occupants will not be comfortable in every part of the house.

One solution to this problem is to install a zoning system. A properly installed zoning system will ensure that the correct amount of airflow is delivered to each zone, so that occupants in every part of the house are comfortable at all times. There are several methods by which airflow can be managed, and it is up to the contractor to decide which technique should be used, depending on the application in question.

When installing zoning, it is always necessary to employ some way to relieve the excess air pressure that may build up in the system.

A static pressure bypass routes the extra air from supply to the return through a bypass loop. The volume of bypass air is controlled by a barometric weighted damper or a motorized damper controlled by a pressure switch. Bypass not only ensures that the right amount of air is delivered to each zone, but it also ensures good airflow over the heat exchanger or a coil and prevents noise at the register.

In some cases, the bypass method may overheat or overcool the delivered air. In this scenario, some manufacturers recommend a discharge air temperature sensor, which senses the temperature of the discharge air. If it gets too hot or cold, it will turn off the equipment but continue to allow the blower to drive air into the calling zones until the discharge air temperature moderates.

Using a discharge air temperature sensor is generally considered a good idea for many applications. However, it is subject to the individual design and must take into account the size of the zones being served.

A bypass isn’t the only method available, especially if there are only two zones that are evenly split. If that is the case then a contractor can upsize the ductwork, making a bypass damper unnecessary. If oversizing the ductwork isn’t possible, however, contractors may introduce velocity and throw problems.

Another way to relieve the excess air pressure is to allow the zone dampers to leak. This method, which is often used when there is no room for a bypass, prevents static pressure from rising when few zones call, as the excess air will bleed into non-calling zones.

Dump and wild zones are areas in a home where the excess air is delivered to relieve static pressure. As with oversizing ductwork and damper leakage, dump and wild zones do manage airflow, but they often generate complaints and callbacks because occupants are not comfortable.


NATE Test Answer:

A technician measures the return air temperature of a 100,000 Btuh output furnace to be 65°F and the supply air temperature to be 135°. What is the cfm?

C. 1,323

 

 

AHR Expo

NATE supports the AHR EXPO.

It is the largest event that brings together all facets of HVACR industry under one roof for three exciting days.

www.ahrexpo.com

 

Links

Technicians

To find a NATE testing organization

To find NATE training resources

Information on NATE recertification

Contractors

To sign up for the free NATE contractor locator as featured on

www.hvacradvice.com click here

To update your listing (recommended at least twice a year) click here

To visit the NATE consumer web site http://www.hvacradvice.com

 

NORTH AMERICAN TECHNICIAN EXCELLENCE

www.natex.org

2111 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 510 • Arlington, VA 22201

877-420-NATE or 877-420-6283 toll free • 703-276-7247 phone • 703-527-2316 fax

To sign up to receive The NATE Advantage e-newsletter, please click here.

THE AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATION NEWS

www.achrnews.com

2401 W. Big Beaver Rd., Suite 700 • Troy, MI 48084 • 248-362-3700 phone

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Posted by
17 Nov 2011
The NATE Advantage
Jackson Systems
GenteqTjernlundRSES

Dwyer/Aire Serv

Ritchie

Tjernlund

HVACR Directory & Source Guide

 

 

This message is brought to you on behalf of the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration News.We hope you’re enjoying your subscription to The NEWS. Visit us online at www.achrnews.com for daily news updates and the latest product information.
NATE's New Website
NATE News: NATE Awards Golden Toolbox

Golden Toolbox Award WinnerNATE awarded Christopher Mohalley, owner of HVAC Dynamics, the sixth annual Golden Toolbox Award, and he couldn’t be more proud.

“My goal with HVAC Dynamics is to make good technicians great through knowledge-based training, and NATE certification is the ideal way to verify this knowledge and expertise,” he explained.

The award recognizes an industry professional who demonstrates outstanding service, support, and advocacy for technician certification.

“All of us at NATE are honored to present Chris with this year’s Golden Toolbox Award,” said Peter Schwartz, NATE president and CEO. “Through his exceptional training efforts, Chris has extended his commitment to continually enhancing his own skills and knowledge to HVACR professionals nationwide, exemplifying NATE’s mission of promoting industry excellence.”

Prior to opening HVAC Dynamics, which specializes in residential HVAC training, Mohalley spent nine years working in residential HVAC field and managerial positions, as well as another five years instructing for International Service Leadership Inc. Then, in 2005, he combined his extensive HVAC field experience, instruction proficiency, and product knowledge to develop a nationally recognized ECM training program for Genteq Motors that offers practical, one-day courses. These courses allow technicians to build the knowledge necessary to enhance professionalism and achieve industry certification.

In addition to owning and operating HVAC Dynamics, Mohalley serves as a NATE Technical Committee SME, a NATE proctor, and chief EPA examiner for the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). He is also a member of Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES) and is NATE-certified in all HVAC disciplines.

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NATE Test Question
The exposed duct in a space is “sweating.” Psychrometric readings show the space at 70°F db and 60°F wb. At what duct surface temperature will the duct stop sweating?

A. 32°F
B. 34°F
C. 44°F
D. 55°F

Scroll to the bottom of this e-newsletter to see the answer.

Psychrometrics — Understanding Air and Water Vapor

(The following is an excerpt from “Psychrometrics: From Start To Finish – Part 1,” by Harlan “Skip” Krepcik, CMS, published in the March 2010 issue of the RSES Journal.)

Specific humidity is a measure of the actual mass of water dissolved into an air sample. It is measured in either pounds or grains of water that have been evaporated into 1 lb of air (7,000 grains equals 1 lb of water). Energy used to remove water mass from an air sample or to add water mass to an air sample is measured in units defined as latent heat. The quantity of heat (Btu) required to change moisture content of air varies with the temperature of the air sample. As the air temperature decreases, the heat quantity needed to evaporate water or to condense water vapor increases.

When air is cooled, its specific volume — and its ability to hold water in solution — decreases due to the increase in density of air as it cools. Consider an air sample at 75°F dry bulb temperature and 50 percent relative humidity. The density of this air equals 0.073126 lb/ft3 and its specific volume equals 13.675 ft3/lb (1/0.073126). Visualize this volume by picturing a ball of air 35.6 in. in diameter. At 50 percent relative humidity, 1 lb of the air sample holds 64.9 grains of water in solution. When saturated, 75°F air can hold 131.8 grains. When this air sample is cooled to 55.15°F, its density increases to 0.0759 lb/ft3, while its specific volume decreases to 13.167 ft3/lb. The “ball” of air in question now has a diameter of 35.15 in. This smaller and denser “container” cannot hold as much water mass in solution as the larger “container” at 75°F. At this lower temperature of 55.15°F, the existing 64.9 grains of water in each pound of air (specific humidity) results in relative humidity equal to 100 percent. The reverse occurs when air is heated — the density of air decreases and its specific volume increases. As the “container” or volume of air expands, it can hold more water in solution.

Consider the same air sample at 75°F dry bulb and 50 percent relative humidity. When heated to 100°F dry-bulb temperature, the sample can hold 302.5 grains of water in each pound of air at saturation (100 percent relative humidity). At this new higher temperature, the specific volume of the sample increases to 15.083 ft3/lb of air. The “ball” of air increases to a diameter equal to 36.79 in. The existing 64.9 grains of water would create only enough vapor pressure to result in relative humidity equal to 22.6 percent.

Want to read the whole article? RSES members receive in-depth articles such as this every month in the RSES Journal, and can access them online any time in the RSES Journal archives.

For more information on becoming an RSES member, click here.

NATE Unveils New Natex.org Website

NATE has redesigned its industry website, www.natex.org, to offer visitors an enhanced experience with easier access to information about certification, valuable tools and industry resources. The new user-friendly design helps visitors quickly find the information they need as the navigation and tools are clearly organized by audience, including technicians, contractors, testing organizations, training organizations, proctors, and other NATE partners.

“The design of our new website accurately reflects who NATE is today – the leading certification body for HVACR technicians,” said Peter Schwartz. “As part of our ongoing mission to make it as easy as possible to work with NATE, we restructured the navigation and enhanced the site’s functionality to ensure a simple, smooth user experience.”

Technicians can access detailed yet manageable information ranging from the basics of NATE certification to tips for preparing and the steps for recertifying. In addition, the site offers online locators for both training and testing organizations to help technicians quickly find nearby locations in their area. For contractors, the site provides valuable information such as the benefits of hiring NATE-certified technicians, access to marketing materials and the ability to validate a technician’s certification by verifying his or her NATE ID number.

Comprehensive information about facilitating tests, offering training and affiliating with NATE is also readily available for proctors, testing organizations, training organizations and partners. To further simplify the user experience, NATE implemented a search function that allows the user to quickly find what they need, as well as a resource library that serves as a repository for documents, forms, marketing materials and industry resources.

In order to keep all industry partners in the loop on the latest developments and updates from NATE, the site will be continuously updated with news, upcoming events and e-newsletters.

To check out the new NATE website, visit www.natex.org.

Top Techs Honored for Excellence

North American Technician Excellence (NATE) recognized three technicians as “Top Techs.” This year’s Top Techs include Ken Fulk of Duncan Supply Co. Inc. in Indianapolis, Ind.; Eric Kaiser of Appel Heating & Air Conditioning in Carmel, Ind.; and Robert Mullis of Love Heating and Cooling in Indianapolis, Ind.

Ken FulkKen Fulk
Fulk, who has been working in the HVACR industry for 37 years, is a field service representative. Prior to joining the Duncan Supply team 18 years ago, he worked as a service technician for 12 years and then owned his own HVACR company for seven years. He holds NATE service and installation certifications in air conditioning, air distribution, gas furnace, heat pump, and light commercial refrigeration.

“My NATE certification verifies that I have proven my abilities to perform at the industry’s highest standards, which ultimately benefits both my company and my customers,” he said. “Taking the time to undergo NATE testing demonstrates my commitment to professionalism, and passing the exam confirms that I have the expertise to get the job done right.”

Eric KaiserEric Kaiser
Kaiser is a residential and light commercial service and installation technician with Appel Heating & Air Conditioning. He has been working as a technician for six years and has been a member of the Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES) since 2007. He holds NATE service and installation certifications in air conditioning and heat pump.

“I got my start in the HVAC industry with Heuman Heating & A/C Inc. in Sparta, Ill. After a short time in the industry, I quickly realized that this arena requires extensive knowledge beyond what I had been taught in the basic classes I had completed,” he noted. “I sought out additional opportunities for training through various channels and ultimately obtained NATE certification, which serves as a benchmark of my proficiency today. Since this is a constantly evolving industry, I continue to learn new things and improve my skills to stay ahead of the curve.”

Robert MullisRobert Mullis
Mullis, who has 18 years of industry experience, is a field supervisor service technician with Love Heating and Cooling. After graduating with honors from ITT Technical Institute, he started his career at AAA Heating and then went on to Air Con Engineering. He has been an integral member of the Love Heating and Cooling team since 1998. Mullis holds NATE service and installation certifications in air conditioning, air distribution, gas furnace, and heat pump.

“Maintaining NATE certification is an ongoing process that ensures that I have the ability to offer my customers superior service,” he said. “By continuously working to hone my skills and knowledge, I stay up to speed on all of the latest advancements in technology, and my NATE certification is proof of that.”

New Officers and Board Members Elected
North American Technician Excellence (NATE) elected a new slate of officers to the Executive Committee as well as five new members to the Board of Trustees for the 2011-2012 term at its biannual board of trustees meeting. The meeting was held on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011 at NATE headquarters in Arlington, Va.

The NATE Board of Trustees named the following:
Chairman of the Board Don Frendberg, Chairman of HARDI
Vice-Chairman Mitchell Cropp, President of Cropp-Metcalfe
Vice-Chairman Chris Baker, President of Virginia Air Distributors
Treasurer David Swift, President and CEO of Goodman/Amana
Immediate Past Chairman Ray Isaac, President of Isaac Heating & Air Conditioning
Parliamentarian Steve Yurek, President of AHRI

“Being named chairman of the NATE Board of Trustees is a tremendous honor and a great responsibility,” said Frendberg. “NATE is the true leader in certifying technician excellence for the HVACR industry, and I look forward to working with the exceptional NATE team and Board to further its achievements.”

New NATE Board of Trustees Members:
Whit Perry HVACR Technology Instructor at Northwest Mississippi Community College
Bill Hainsworth Vice President and General Manager of the Heating and Cooling Division for Rheem Manufacturing
Wade Mayfield President of Thermal Services
Wayne R. Reedy Representative for ASHRAE
John Conrad Publisher of The ACHR News

“I’m honored to congratulate the 2011-2012 slate of officers and welcome the new members of the NATE Board of Trustees,” said Peter Schwartz. “With this dedicated team of brilliant industry professionals, NATE is well-poised for continued success and I value the opportunity to work with each and every one of them.”

Training Opportunities:
Learning Management Systems
Want to know more about HVAC so you can further your career? The Learning Management System (LMS) enables you to learn all you need to — HVAC-wise — and still maintain a regular work schedule. The online collection of more than 400 HVAC technical, sales, and business courses are available for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and can be accessed anywhere you have an internet connection. Start with a Tech Needs Assessment to evaluate your own knowledge and plan your “curriculum” from there. Also, for the business owner, there are great online courses on relevant subjects, such as leadership, communication, and personal and career development. The LMS combines cost effectiveness with convenience and flexibility — it is a great way to expand your knowledge, refine your skills, and further develop your potential. Learn more about pricing here: http://hvacls.com/onlinepricing.php

For more information go to www.hvacls.com or contact us at info@hvacls.com.

NATE Test Answer:

The exposed duct in a space is “sweating.” Psychrometric readings show the space at 70°F db and 60°F wb. At what duct surface temperature will the duct stop sweating?

D. 55°F


 

 

2012 AHR ExpoNATE supports the AHR EXPO.
It is the largest event that brings together all facets of HVACR industry under one roof for three exciting days.
www.ahrexpo.com

 

 

Links

Technicians
To find a NATE testing organization

To find NATE training resources

Information on NATE recertification

Contractors
To sign up for the free NATE contractor locator as featured on
www.hvacradvice.com click here

To update your listing (recommended at least twice a year) click here

To visit the NATE consumer web site http://www.hvacradvice.com

NORTH AMERICAN TECHNICIAN EXCELLENCE
www.natex.org
2111 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 510 • Arlington, VA 22201
877-420-NATE or 877-420-6283 toll free • 703-276-7247 phone • 703-527-2316 fax
To sign up to receive The NATE Advantage e-newsletter, please click here.THE AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATION NEWS
www.achrnews.com
2401 W. Big Beaver Rd., Suite 700 • Troy, MI 48084 • 248-362-3700 phone
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Posted by
21 Sep 2011
The NATE Advantage
NATE News: “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes Winners

The first two winners of the “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes have been named, with two additional winners yet to be selected throughout the remainder of the year. BNB Mechanical of Rancho Cucamonga, California, and Parrish Services of Manassas, Virginia, each submitted winning entries in the sweepstakes, which rewards contractors for promoting their NATE-certified technicians.

Bob Johnston, owner of BNB Mechanical submitted an example of a newspaper advertisement featuring the new NATE logo, while Linda Couch, chief operating officer for Parrish Services, submitted examples of their marketing collateral, company website and technician lanyards that prominently feature NATE. Their entries were randomly selected from numerous submissions received from contractors throughout the country, including brochures, vehicle signage, videos, business cards and other examples of how each company highlights their NATE-certified technicians.

Both BNB Mechanical and Parrish Services received a $1,000 prize to be used towards local advertising and/or NATE promotional materials.

Two additional winners will be selected throughout the remainder of the year. To enter, contractors are invited to submit descriptions and pictures of the various ways that they use NATE to build consumer confidence and attract new customers. With each submission, the contractor is entered into a regular drawing for a chance to win the $1,000 prize.

The “Showcase Your NATE” entries can be submitted via email to sweepstakes@natex.org or by mailing them to “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes, 2111 Wilson Blvd #510, Arlington, VA 22201. Many entries will be featured on NATE’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/natecertification) and in other communication materials. For more information about the sweepstakes, visit www.natex.org.

NATE Test Question
An Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV):

A. transfers heat and removes moisture from the incoming air.
B. transfers heat and increases moisture to the building.
C. transfers heat only.
D. removes moisture only.

Scroll to the bottom of this e-newsletter to see the answer.

Can You Explain an ERV to Your Customer?

An Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) transfers heat and moisture between the incoming and outgoing air streams. There is a standardized testing protocol (CAN/CSA – 439) that determines how efficiently this transfer takes place. These measures, along with others, allow customers to compare the many ERVs currently on the market.

Apparent Sensible Effectiveness (ASE) relates to the temperature of the incoming fresh air after it passes through the heat exchanger. The higher the percent at a given air flow, the warmer the incoming air. However, temperature is not the sole determinate of comfort. Humidity must be considered. In the winter, the goal is for a reasonable amount of humidity (say 40 – 55% RH) to stay in the house. In the summer, you want to keep the humidity outside. There are two tests that determine the capacity to either retain or exclude humidity.

Net Moisture Transfer (NMT) relate to the percentage of moisture that is returned to your home in the winter. In the summer, Total Recovery Effectiveness (TRE) includes testing to determine how much humidity is left outside. The more humidity kept outside, the less work the air conditioner or dehumidifier must do.

Energy savings are critical to consumers. So it is also important to test the amount of energy savings realized at specified air flows in comparison to opening a window and bringing in an equivalent amount of fresh air. The Sensible Recovery Efficiency (SRE) percentage takes into account the amount of energy utilized to operate the unit, as well as the energy required to reheat the amount of air exchanged. The energy savings depend on the climate of the area, the type of heating system, and its efficiency. The higher a SRE percentage, the more energy will be saved.

Also it is important to rate ventilators and compare them based on how well they actually deliver and exhaust air. Testing provides a graph of the ability of a ventilation system to deliver inlet and exhaust air at differing pressures measured in inches of water (in W.C.) or Pascals (Pa.) This is a important because it indicates the ability of the blowers to deliver the called for fresh air over the resistance that the air encounters as it travels through the duct work of the home. Electronically commutated motor/blowers are programmed to deliver the called for air through a range of static pressures and can ensure that the incoming and outgoing air-flows are, and remain, balanced.

Learn more about UltimateAir®’s Value Added Reseller program and receive exclusive information to better sell our RecoupAerator® air filtration/ventilation system in your service area.

Honeywell eLearning LIVE Schedule

Online or on the phone, you can earn one hour of NATE continuing education hours for every live session of Honeywell eLearning listed below that you attend and complete.

ONLINE:
1. Log onto: http://honeywellna.conferencing.com/
2. At the top of the page, click on the “Participant” button.
3. Enter Code *4793843*
4. Once logged in, select “Already Dialed” in from entry window.
ON THE PHONE:
1. Dial 1-866-590-5496
2. Enter Code *4793843*
AVAILABLE CLASSES:
September 13, 2011, 10:00 a.m. CSTHow to Sell Zoning to Homeowners

Did you know that 67 percent of U.S. homeowners are uncomfortable in their home at certain times of the year? Homeowners want zoning and that makes contractor zoning knowledge and education key. Learn from experts how to spot zone-able houses, offer zoning to homeowners, and close the deal on installing a new zoning system in their home.

September 20, 2011, 10:00 a.m. CSTUniversal Digital Oil PrimaryThe R7284U1004 oil primary sets a new standard for universal application and system diagnostics. Join us to learn how stocking this single control can cover almost any application in an oil-fired appliance and provide service technicians with the information to correct a problem quickly and keep them moving profitably.
September 27, 2011, 10:00 a.m. CSTHoneywell’s Newest Product IntroductionsThe history of Honeywell product performance and reliability have made us the #1 preferred consumer brand — dial in to hear about our exciting new products and learn how they can help you renew your business! The latest additions to Honeywell’s superior environmental control solutions span a wide range of product lines and offer a variety of revolutionary applications. This session will give you an overview of the latest products, and teach you how to begin turning them into profit!
Keep Indoor Air Fresh and Save Energy

With increasing numbers of customers making green and energy-efficient decisions, it’s becoming even more important for HVAC contractors to pay attention to their customers’ air quality.

“As the energy-efficiency focus of the green movement continues to gain momentum and even existing homes are being tightened for energy savings and carbon footprint reduction, the importance of proper ventilation is often lost in the rush to implement associated measures,” said Allen Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute (HHI).

“Air is the No. 1 route of exposure to unhealthy substances in the indoor environment,” he said. “What’s healthy for people should not be neglected in favor of what’s healthy for the planet; rather, the two goals should peacefully coexist. Adequate fresh air should be an equal priority to energy savings. Controlled mechanical ventilation is the best way to achieve both intelligently.”

The most important thing for contractors to be doing now, to increase their IAQ work, is the most important thing many have been advising them to do for a long time: “Educate, educate, educate the consumer about the tradeoff that exists between tightened homes and indoor air quality, and offer solutions to address both,” said Rathey. “Contractors should learn to measure indoor air contaminant levels using handheld devices, then inform the consumer about available solutions which they can provide.”

NEW WHITE PAPER

HHI and the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI) jointly released a White Paper, “Victory over VOCs – Energy-Saving Fans and Other Devices Help Keep Indoor Air Fresh.” It explains that “IAQ has been a growing concern, particularly when it comes to newer, energy-efficient homes.

While tight, well-insulated homes save money and are better for the environment, they may also trap unhealthy indoor pollutants inside.”
While energy-saving homes are good at keeping in heat or air conditioning, this may cause them to retain high levels of harmful compounds, the paper points out. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be up to 10 times higher indoors than outdoors. (VOCs are carbon-based gases emitted into the air by common household products or furnishings.)

The paper points to source removal and adequate, year-round ventilation as solutions. Ventilation products cited in the paper include:

  • Exhaust fans with high-efficiency motors, which remove pollutants and moisture in specific areas of the home such as in bathrooms, showers, kitchens, and workshops and utility areas.
  • Whole-house comfort ventilators; properly located, it draws cooler outside air through screened windows and doors, pulls it up through the house, and exhausts it, usually through static vents in the attic.
  • Heat recovery ventilators (HRVs) and energy recovery ventilators (ERVs); for whole-house ventilation, HRVs and ERVs bring in outdoor air, circulate it through the home, and expel stale air to the outside while preserving energy. The heat from the exhaust air is retained by the unit’s core and used to warm the air coming in from the outside. In the summer, the process works in reverse. An ERV can also modulate the moisture that is retained or lost.

NATE Test Answer:

An Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV):

A. transfers heat and removes moisture from the incoming air.

 

NATE Re-Test
In June, we provided a question about ECM motors but provided the incorrect answer. Here is the complete question along with the correct answer.Question:What type of bearings does an ECM motor use (Residential and Light Commercial applications only) and is bearing play allowed? 

A. Sleeve bearing, axial play OK, no radial play.
B. Sleeve bearing, no axial no radial play.
C. Ball bearing, axial play OK, no radial play.
D. Ball bearing, no axial, no radial play

Answer:

C. Ball bearing, axial play OK, no radial play.
Links

Technicians

To find a NATE testing organization

To find NATE training resources

Information on NATE recertification

Contractors

To sign up for the free NATE contractor locator as featured on

www.hvacradvice.com click here

To update your listing (recommended at least twice a year) click here

To visit the NATE consumer web site http://www.hvacradvice.com

Posted by
01 Sep 2011

What type of bearings does an ECM motor use (Residential and Light Commercial applications only) and is bearing play allowed?

A. Sleeve bearing, axial play OK, no radial play.

B. Sleeve bearing, no axial no radial play.

C. Ball bearing, axial play OK, no radial play.

D. Ball bearing, no axial, no radial play.

Scroll to the bottom of this e-newsletter to see the answer.

TECHNICAL EXPLANATION
The ECM motors from Regal Beloit (Genteq) that are used in HVAC applications use (2) ball bearings. There should be no radial play, as the bearings at each end of the shaft are captured in bearing pockets in the end shields. These pockets are designed such that the bearings can be inserted into the pockets, but with very little tolerance. A small amount of forced axial play is allowed. If one pushes down or pulls on the shaft, the rotor assembly can be forced to move a small amount. This is because there is a “wavy washer,” a spring, under one of the bearings. This spring is to provide some pre load on the rotor assembly to keep the bearings (rotor assembly) from pounding against one end shield, since there is some tolerance between the bearing to bearing length and the end shield to end shield (pocket to pocket) distance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NATE CERTIFICATION SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS
As an ever-increasing number of technicians and contractors recognize the value of NATE certification, the number of certified technicians continues to climb to new levels daily. Since its inception in 1997, NATE has administered a total of 200,537 tests to HVACR technicians.

As the only certification organization developed and supported by the entire HVACR industry, NATE is the true leader in certifying technician excellence and the nation’s largest non-profit certification organization for HVACR practices. NATE certification applies only to HVACR technicians, and a total of nearly 50,000 technicians to date have taken advantage of the opportunity to showcase their real-world, working knowledge by becoming certified. Today, almost 30,000 technicians hold an active NATE certification, with 20% of these technicians holding multiple certifications.

Once a technician becomes NATE-certified, they are provided with materials that highlight their accomplishment — such as wallet cards, certificates, and patches. NATE offers an online locator that connects homeowners with contractors employing NATE-certified technicians at www.hvacradvice.com.

NATE acts as a partner for today’s experienced HVACR technicians, helping them to demonstrate their ongoing ability to perform at the industry’s highest standards. To make it easy for technicians to stay on top of their certification status, NATE created an online dashboard that allows the technician to login and view the expiration date for their certifications, their continuing education hours, as well as their local training and testing locations.

When it comes to certifying excellence among HVACR technicians, NATE is number one. For more information, visit www.natex.org.

ON THE ROAD TO ANSI-ACCREDITATION
In 2011, NATE is taking the steps towards becoming an ANSI-accredited organization. ANSI, which stands for the American National Standards Institute, has served as the coordinator of the U.S. private sector, voluntary standardization system for more than 90 years. ANSI provides a neutral forum for the development of policies on standards issues and serves as a watchdog for standards development and conformity assessment. The ANSI Federation also accredits qualified organizations, whose standards development process meets all of ANSI’s requirements, to develop American National Standards. Through these efforts, ANSI aims to enhance the competitiveness of U.S businesses while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

Achieving ANSI accreditation is a long process that requires an extensive amount of time spent reviewing all practices and processes currently in place. ANSI’s first independent audit of NATE, which was held in April 2011, provided information and insight that is already strengthening the NATE process today. Based on this initial audit, NATE is implementing changes to ensure that all testing organizations throughout the country are following NATE protocol and upholding the integrity of certification, which ultimately protects the technician and results in a consistent, quality testing experience.

As NATE continues down the path towards the prestigious ANSI accreditation, we will continue to keep you informed of the ongoing progress and improvements that result from these efforts.

NATE AND RESNET ENTER INTO MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
NATE and the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in order to promote the improvement of home energy performance in the United States. Under this agreement, NATE and RESNET will collaborate on key initiatives to meet this goal, while also supporting the growth of both organizations.

To kick off this strategic partnership, Patrick Murphy, Vice President of Certification for NATE, was recently appointed to the RESNET Technical Committee. As part of his role on the committee, Murphy will be responsible for assisting RESNET in the development of protocols for rating the performance of HVAC systems.

One of the key components of the MOU is that NATE and RESNET will advocate for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) recognition of NATE-certified technicians in meeting the HVAC requirements in its ENERGY STAR(r) Qualified New Homes Program. The two organizations will also work together to identify the training and NATE certification required for raters to determine whether there is adequate air flow across the heat exchanger/coil. In addition, NATE and RESNET will develop a plan for expanding these ‘new homes’ activities into the ‘existing homes’ market by creating a program that can ultimately be recognized by the Department of Energy (DOE), EPA and other Federal, State and utility retrofit efforts.

By joining forces on initiatives such as these, as well supporting each organization’s membership efforts and activities, NATE and RESNET aim to achieve greater success in their shared mission to promote residential energy efficiency.

“This partnership between NATE and RESNET is a significant step forward in our effort to improve energy performance,” stated Peter Schwartz, president of NATE. “By working together to achieve the same goal, our organizations have twice the resources available to use towards this end, as well as a louder voice in this arena than ever before. We look forward to a long and successful collaboration.”

 

NATE continues to show its support for the U.S. Military by extending certification for HVAC technicians called to active duty. From the day a NATE-certified military service member deploys, their NATE certification is deferred until they return, ensuring that the technician comes back to work with the same qualifications as when he or she left. Upon their return, the technician receives all new NATE certification documents and the expiration date of their certification is extended to reflect their time in service.

“All of us at NATE feel that this policy is critically important for our NATE-certified technicians active in the military, and it is the least we can do to support our troops,” stated Patrick Murphy, Vice President of Certification for NATE. “The last thing these honorable and esteemed professionals need to worry about is the status of their certification. By stopping the clock on their NATE certification, we aim to do our small part in helping these technicians pick up where they left off when they return from serving our country.”

Active duty technicians can simply contact NATE upon their return to process the certification extension and to have their new documents shipped. Mark Butler, a NATE-certified technician and reservist who most recently served in Iraq and Afghanistan from September 2008 until November 2010, recently reached out to NATE regarding the status of his certification. “It means a lot that NATE is willing to re-up our certification to make up for the time we’re overseas,” said Butler. “Once I found that out, it was one less concern for me as I made the transition from active duty in the Middle East back to my work as an HVAC technician in Massachusetts.”

For more information about this policy, please contact Pat Murphy at PMurphy@natex.org.

NATE Test Answer:

What type of bearings does an ECM motor use (Residential and Light Commercial applications only) and is bearing play allowed?

D. Ball bearing, no axial, no radial play.

 

Technicians
To find a NATE testing organization

To find NATE training resources

Information on NATE recertification

Contractors
To sign up for the free NATE contractor locator as featured on
www.hvacradvice.com click here

To update your listing (recommended at least twice a year) click here

To visit the NATE consumer web site http://www.hvacradvice.com

Posted by
01 Aug 2011

 

 

 

 

NATE Launches Campaign to Educate the Consumer, Elevate the Contractor
ARLINGTON, Va. — North American Technician Excellence (NATE) is kicking off a campaign to educate homeowners throughout the country about the importance of selecting contractors who hire NATE-certified technicians. By obtaining NATE certification, a technician verifies that they possess the skills and knowledge to perform at the highest industry standards, demonstrating their value to both the customer and their hiring contractor.
In 2011, NATE aims to increase consumer awareness of this quality assurance offered by certification, while simultaneously elevating those contractors who demonstrate their commitment to excellence by demanding NATE certification. In addition, NATE is making it easier for contractors to promote their NATE-certified technicians and rewarding these efforts with the new “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes.

CONSUMERS, MEET NATE
Through network radio advertisements, mentions on national television,  and articles in newspapers and magazines, today’s homeowners will be informed of the protection and peace-of-mind that results from hiring NATE-certified HVACR professionals. For example, radio ads will air on programs such as CBS World News, Dennis Miller, and Bill O’Reilly, as well as NCAA and NFL football, driving homeowners to the NATE consumer website (www.hvacradvice.com) to find local HVACR contractors who employ NATE-certified technicians.

As an increasing number of homeowners learn about NATE and visit the site to find a qualified contractor in their area, it’s more important than ever for contractors to include their company information on the Consumer Contractor Connection — NATE’s online locator tool. If 50 percent of a contractor’s technicians are NATE-certified, they are eligible to post a free listing in the Consumer Contractor Connection, helping to attract new customers.

“The overall goal of this program is to educate homeowners about NATE certification; not only is this effort important in terms of consumer protection and quality assurance, but it also ultimately improves the business of those contractors who demonstrate their dedication to superior installation and service,” stated Peter Schwartz, NATE president and CEO. “As an industry advocate, NATE aims to promote the HVACR industry’s knowledge and commitment to excellence, which is exemplified by maintaining certification.”

SHOWCASE YOUR NATE  FOR SUCCESS
To further assist contractors in capitalizing on these upcoming efforts and connecting to consumers seeking NATE-certified technicians, a new dime-sized logo is available for use in contractors’ advertisements. The new NATE logo clearly communicates that the contractor employs certified technicians, while leaving ample space for their company information and other important messages. Qualified contractors can visit NATE’s website (www.natex.org) to request the logo for use in their consumer communication.

Since many top contractors actively promote their NATE-certified technicians to highlight their expertise and increase their business, NATE is also launching the new “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes to reward these efforts. To participate, contractors are invited to submit descriptions and pictures of the various ways that they use NATE to build consumer confidence and attract new customers. With each submission, the contractor is entered into a regular drawing for a chance to win $1,000 in free local advertising and/or NATE promotional materials. Many entries will also be featured online, offering the contractor additional exposure and recognition for their commitment to quality work.

The “Showcase Your NATE” entries can be submitted via email to sweepstakes@natex.org or by mailing them to “Showcase Your NATE” Sweepstakes, 2111 Wilson Blvd #510, Arlington, VA 22201. Many entries will be featured on NATE’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/natecertification) and in other communication materials. For more information about the sweepstakes, visit www.natex.org.

 

Which of the following differences between low voltage wiring and line voltage wiring is true when run between enclosures?

A. All wiring below 50V is considered low voltage, wiring for 50V or greater is  considered line voltage.

B. All wiring below 30V is considered low voltage, wiring for 30V or greater is considered line voltage.

C. All low voltage wiring must be done with 18-22 awg while line voltage wiring must use 14 awg or larger.

D. Low voltage wiring can only be used for electronic controls, while line voltage runs must be used for all others.

Scroll to the bottom of this e-newsletter to see the answer.

 

 

North American Technician Excellence (NATE) endeavors to make recertification as easy as possible for technicians and provides two different ways for technicians to recertify:

1. Retake your NATE specialty exam.
2. Earn continuing education hours.

OPTION 1: TESTING
Retaking a previously certified NATE Specialty Exam before it expires and is out of its 60 day grace period will renew technicians’ certification. It is not necessary to retake the core exam as long as the technician holds at least one active certification. Find an updated NATE Testing Organizations list at www.natex.org and access the “Find a Testing Organization” tool. There is not a special test for recertification.

OPTION 2: CONTINUING EDUCATION HOURS
Submitting a NATE Recertification Application with evidence of 60 completed hours of continuing education that applies to the specialty will renew technician certification. The application can be found at www.natex.org under “Technicians & Certification — Recertification.” There is a list of NATE Recognized Training Providers on the website as well. Click the “Find a Training Organization” tool. These are organizations that provide recognized courses for NATE recertification. These courses will be automatically tracked for technicians as a courtesy of NATE, as long as the technician’s NATE ID number is provided on the attendance forms when attending these classes and those that are relevant to the technician’s specialty. NATE will also accept any non-recognized technical education course that is relevant to a technician’s specialty. A certificate of completion, which outlines name of the course, a brief course description, provider, and the length of the course, must be included with the recertification application in order to receive credit for courses not recognized by NATE. View a sample certificate of completion on NATE’s website. Courses that cover multiple specialties can be used to receive credit hours for each specialty.

IT’S NOT TOO LATE
To assist busy technicians, NATE allows a 60 day grace period after the certification has expired to recertify. To recertify, technicians are required to take their specialty test within the 60 days. When the grace period expires, technicians are then required to take both the core and specialty exams again.

According to Ray Isaac, NATE chairman of the board, the importance of maintaining certification has never been clearer.

“Once a technician has taken the time to become NATE-certified, upholding that level of expertise by recertifying every five years is the obvious next step. Credentialing is an important element of any recognized profession, and maintaining those credentials is just as important as gaining them.”

Some contractors may have policies and practices in place to encourage the technician to maintain their NATE certification, but the responsibility ultimately falls on the technician. The NATE wallet card shows the technician’s specialties and the expiration dates, which can serve as a simple reminder to the technician of when they need to recertify.

“The easiest way to stay on top of certification is to avoid waiting until the last minute, and to absolutely avoid a lapse in certification,” said Isaac. “Once a technician has become NATE-certified, it’s undoubtedly in their best interest to maintain this recognition of expertise through regular recertification.”

NATE Test Answer:

Which of the following differences between low voltage wiring and line voltage wiring is true when run between enclosures?

A. All wiring below 50V is considered low voltage, wiring for 50V or greater is considered line voltage.

 

Technicians
To find a NATE testing organization

To find NATE training resources

Information on NATE recertification

Contractors
To sign up for the free NATE contractor locator as featured on
www.hvacradvice.com click here

To update your listing (recommended at least twice a year) click here

To visit the NATE consumer web site http://www.hvacradvice.com